Sarah Miller

Sarah Miller is the Executive Director of the American Economic Liberties Project. Previously, she served as the Deputy Director of the Open Markets Institute, which was credited by Rolling Stone as “the driving force behind the resurgence in public understanding and desire for action around antitrust and monopolies.” She is also Co-Chair of Freedom From Facebook, a coalition of progressive groups that succeeded in bringing the concept of breaking up Facebook into the mainstream.

Prior to Open Markets, Sarah spent 15 years in Washington D.C. working on policy and strategic communications from the vantage points of campaigns, advocacy organizations, and the federal government. She was a policy advisor at the U.S. Treasury in the Obama Administration, worked as an advisor to John Podesta at the Center for American Progress, helped launch and lead the Washington Center for Equitable Growth, and served as a policy staffer for Hillary Clinton’s 2008 presidential run. She graduated from the University of Chicago with honors and hails from Muskogee, Oklahoma.

You can reach Sarah at smiller@economicliberties.us.

Latest Publications

The Appeal: Last Week’s Big Tech Antitrust Hearings Sent An Unmistakable Message – Change is in the Air for America’s Corporate Giants

Anti-Monopoly Policies & EnforcementTech

August 6, 2020 —Economic Liberties' Executive Director Sarah Miller published a piece in the Appeal about the growing desire to break with the 1970s-era, hands-off antitrust ideology that has caused extreme economic concentration.

Democracy Journal: End Monopoly Power

Anti-Monopoly Policies & Enforcement

July 14, 2020— In an exclusive piece for Democracy Journal, Economic Liberties’ Executive Director Sarah Miller explains how the rise of monopolies has contributed to wealth inequality, and why combatting concentrated economic power is essential for protecting our democracy.

Addressing Facebook and Google’s Harms Through a Regulated Competition Approach

April 10, 2020 - Economic Liberties latest Working Paper in a series on corporate power, "How to Address Facebook and Google’s Harm Through a Regulated Competition Approach." The paper explains the policy choices that allowed Facebook and Google to develop a business model toxic to democracy and civil rights, and explains how a “regulated competition” approach is necessary to rein in these technology giants.